Dras online dating


(“Everyone knows that all personality profiling is bull****,” a former Match executive told him.

“As a marketing hook, it works great.”) In reality, dating sites are most effective as a kind of virtual town square — a place where random people whose paths wouldn’t otherwise cross bump into each other and start talking.

And yet, just this week, a new analysis from Michigan State University found that online dating leads to fewer committed relationships than offline dating does — that it doesn’t work, in other words.

A record number of Americans have never been married, and only a scant majority — 53 percent — want to be.

Americans get married later every year, if they choose to get married at all.

That’s not much different from your neighborhood bar, except in its scale, ease of use and demographics.

But in terms of actual function, the things we think of as uniquely “online” in online dating — the algorithms, the personality profiles, the “29 dimensions of compatibility” — don’t appear to make too much of a difference in how the enterprise “works.” Meanwhile, all this is happening during a time of enormous revolution in the way we conceive of relationships and commitment.

And a 2013 paper that suggested Internet access is boosting marriage rates.